QUESTION MAN
OCD equally affects men, women and children of all races, cultures and  socio-economic backgrounds.
 With the correct understanding tools and techniques, OCD is a treatable and manageble condition.

What is OCD?

"It is a Genetically Inherited Neuro- Psychiatric Condition. It is caused by overactive brain circuits in the error detection part of the brain that sits right over the eye sockets"
Jeffrey M. Schwartz, M.D. is an American psychiatrist and researcher in the field of neuroplasticity and its application to obsessive-compulsive disorder.

The OCD Therapy Clinic is an OCD Treatment and OCD Counselling and help facility based in UK

Many people with OCD suffer in silence and are shamed by their behaviours. They don’t realise it’s a neurobiological problem which is fully manageable and treatable. Implementation of appropriate treatment produces changes in the brain by strengthening new neurological pathways and weakening old ones allowing the brain to function normally. The symptoms of OCD causes anxiety and depression.

OCD comprises of two elements:

  • Obsessions: are worries, thoughts, ideas, images and urges that are persistent and intrusive. The intrusive constant worry can be about anything, but generally it would be about a fear regarding yourself, something or someone you care about. The obsession will be accompanied by an irrational feeling and or belief there is something wrong, which contributes to making them exaggerated, magnified and distorted.

 

  • Compulsions: are the repetitive acts to calm, neutralise and eliminate the obsession. They exhibit in many forms and can manifest in both covert (ruminating, silent repetitive chanting, counting and preying) and or overt behaviours (actions which are observable to others) All would typically involve reassurance seeking, checking, ritualising and ruminating.
    At first the compulsion may well work and gives the sufferer a sense of control and peace. However the solution soon becomes the problem as the behaviour fuels the obsession. The more they respond to the irrational intrusion the more they are compelled to perform the compulsion and in turn rewire their brains in an unhealthy way which can be likened to an addiction to certainty and a fear of anxiety and worry.

OCD is diagnosed when the Obsessions and Compulsions:

  • Consume excessive amounts of time (approximately an hour or more).
  • Cause considerable amount of distress, anxiety and worry.
  • Hinder day to day functioning at home, school, or work; or interfere with social activities/ family life/relationships.

 

The OCD Cycle

ocd pp cycle

As you can see from the above diagramme OCD is a perpetuating cycle. The more you surrender to the urges the stronger the condition becomes.

Hope

Although OCD is a complex condition it can be successfully treated and managed. The key management skills for life programme will give you all the tools you need to successfully overcome OCD.

Causes of OCD:

Although there has been much research into the causes of OCD there is not one single conclusive theory. It would generally be a combination of factors including the following:

Biological/Genetic:

Genetically inherited genes are thought to play a role in the development of the brain. However there has been no specific gene linked to OCD however OCD does tend to run in families. Therefore a person affected by OCD is four times more likely to have another family member with the condition compared to someone who does not have OCD.

Brain Abnormalities:

Brain imaging studies of people with OCD have shown increased activity and blood flow and a lack of the brain chemical serotonin.

The area of the brain affected deals with strong emotions and how we react to those emotions. The good news is when successful treatment was implemented, brain activity returned to normal.

Serotonin:

Serotonin appears to play a part in OCD. It is not known for sure how serotonin contributes to OCD, but people with OCD appear to have decreased levels of this chemical in their brain. It is a chemical transmitter in the brain that transmits information from one brain cell to another. Serotonin is responsible for regulating appetite, sleep, memory, mood, anxiety, temperature and learning.

Environmental life events:

Significant life events such as bereavement, moving, losing your job, changing schools, pregnancy, puberty, being bullied can trigger OCD in people who already have the biological predisposition.

Although stress does not cause OCD, it can make the symptoms of OCD worse.

Psychological:

The Obsessive-Compulsive Cognitions Working Group, an international group of researchers who have proposed that the onset and maintenance of OCD are associated with maladaptive interpretations of cognitive intrusions, has identified six types of dysfunctional beliefs associated with OCD:

1.  Inflated responsibility: a belief that one has the ability to cause and/or is responsible for preventing negative outcomes;

 2.  Overimportance of thoughts (also known as thought-action fusion): the belief that having a bad thought can influence the probability of the occurrence of a negative event or that having a bad thought (e.g., about doing something) is morally equivalent to actually doing it;

 3.  Control of thoughts: A belief that it is both essential and possible to have total control over one’s own thoughts;

 4.  Overestimation of threat: a belief that negative events are very probable and that they will be particularly bad;

 5.  Perfectionism: a belief that one cannot make mistakes and that imperfection is unacceptable; and

 6.  Intolerance for uncertainty: a belief that it is essential and possible to know, without a doubt, that negative events won’t happen.

 Infection:

Some children develop OCD after having a throat infection caused by streptococcal bacteria.

One theory is that antibodies (infection- fighting proteins) produced by the body react with part of the brain, leading to OCD. Streptococcal does not cause OCD, but can trigger symptoms in children who are genetically predisposed to the condition.

 


Who suffers?

Many people with OCD suffer in silence and are shamed by their behaviours. They don’t realise it’s a neurobiological problem which is fully manageable and treatable. Implementation of appropriate treatment produces changes in the brain by strengthening new neurological pathways and weakening old ones allowing the brain to function normally.

 2-3% of the population are thought to experience clinical OCD. Many more experience subclinical OCD.
OCD is a systemic disorder and can disrupt the lives of the family and carers.

Children of all ages can develope the condition. I will adapt and devise the programme to suit the age developement of the child.

Contact Us

OCD Therapy Clinic
‘Windsmeet’
42, Tidcombe Lane,
Tiverton.
Devon. EX16 4EQ

E-Mail

info@helpforocd.co.uk

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0781 206 7192

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